Monday, 27 November 2017

Scabies Rash Pictures

Scabies is an itchy and contagious skin disease. It is caused by Sarcoptes scabiei, a small eight-legged parasite. It is an extremely tiny insect that it can burrow itself into the skin thereby producing an intense itchy feeling. The itching is at its peak at nighttime. (1, 2)




Scabies Rash Pictures

 A specific type of mite that causes scabies scabies rash pictures

picture 1: A specific type of mite that causes scabies.
image source:  medicinenet.com

A close up look at a person's skin infected with scabies scabies rash pictures

picture 2: A close up look at a person's skin infected with scabies.
 image source: www.healthline.com
A severe form of scabies affecting the integrity of the skin scabies rash pictures
picture 3: A severe form of scabies affecting the integrity of the skin.
image source: www.healthline.com


A comparison image between bed bug bites and scabies.A comparison image between bed bug bites and scabies sacbies rash images
picture 4: A comparison image between bed bug bites and scabies.
image source:  www.drscabies.com
Crusted scabies in a male genitalia scabies rash images
Picture 5: Crusted scabies in a male genitalia.
image source: www.derm101.com

Differentiating flea bites and scabies scabies rash photos
Picture 6: Differentiating flea bites and scabies.
image source:  www.fleabites.net



What does scabies rash look like?

A scabies rash is distinct from the rest because it is a combination of bumps and blisters. scabies affects a specific area of the body. It usually affects the areas in between the fingers, back of the elbows, wrist, areas around the waist, knees, umbilicus, axillary folds, buttocks, and the genital region. 

Scabies rash symptoms are characterized by papules which might contain blood crust. Scabies rashes are described as burrows or tunnels, a thread-like projection typically 2 mm to 15 mm long. The projections are usually brown, gray, or red lines. If the burrows are scratched, they become less visible. 

However, scratching scabies rash is highly discouraged because it opens the skin leading to the formation of scab. (1, 2, and 3)

How do you catch scabies?

Scabies affects people who get in contact with mites. Even healthy people can have scabies. A direct contact with a person with scabies can make you susceptible to infection. A person infested for the first time does not immediately have symptoms. 

At an early stage, scabies is misdiagnosed with other skin conditions such as mosquito bites or pimples. As soon as the symptoms develop, the patient starts to complain of itching that can get severe over the weeks. In fact, the itching is extreme that you find it extremely difficult to sleep at night. (4, 5)


Diagnosis

A skin scraping test is performed to check for the presence of mites. A polymerase chain reaction testing can also be performed to pinpoint the genetic material of scabies mites. (5)

How to treat scabies?

How do you get rid of scabies? Prescription medications are used to effectively treat scabies. The prescription medication is usually in the forms of creams or lotions. In some instances, a prescription pill is used to treat scabies. An antihistamine pill is also prescribed to relieve itching. (6, 7)

Scabies home remedies

  • Tea tree oil

It contains terpinen-4-ol, a powerful compound that kills parasite causing scabies.
  • Neem oil

It contains both antibacterial and antifungal properties, which makes it effective for the treatment of scabies.
  • Turmeric

It helps in the management of symptoms of scabies. (4, 5, and 6)

Scabies Prevention 

Stay away from people with scabies. Do not get in contact with people with scabies. Do not use the clothing and linen used an infected person. Keep your things clean at all times including mattresses and furniture. (7)


References

  1. http://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/wps/wcm/connect/public+content/sa+health+internet/health+topics/health+conditions+prevention+and+treatment/bites+burns+cuts+and+pests/scabies/scabies+-+including+symptoms+treatment+and+prevention
  2. https://www.medicinenet.com/scabies/article.htm
  3. https://www.healthline.com/health/scabies
  4. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/scabies/
  5. https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/ss/slideshow-scabies-overview
  6. https://www.emedicinehealth.com/scabies/article_em.htm
  7. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/16961.php